Creative Campaigns #10 – “Got no strings” Beats by Dre

Creative Campaigns #10 – “Got no strings” Beats by Dre

It’s throwback Thursday and this is my tenth creative campaign post, to celebrate I’ve got a great PR campaign for you from last year.

In October 2016, Beats by Dre released an advert for it’s bluetooth headphones

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#IamTeamGB – get involved! Olympic legacy in action.

#IamTeamGB – get involved! Olympic legacy in action.

Last week I volunteered to help out with the nation’s biggest sports day down my local rowing club. It was a fantastic day with an impressive turn out of people wanting to try the sport. However, you may ask, what has this got to do with public relations?

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Creative Campaigns #1: The Fun Theory

Creative Campaigns #1: The Fun Theory

One of my favourite aspects of PR is branding and campaigns. Sometimes companies just get branding right. They nail it. If the term ‘x-factor’ wasn’t now mainly associated with a TV talent show, this is exactly where you’d use it. It’s a mixture of innovation, creativity and genius.

I’ve decided that I’ll feature my favourites in this blog, some you’ll know, others you won’t, some will be old and some may be new, but whatever they do I hope they bring a smile to your face and inspire you in your own PR creations.

Have a look and watch the videos at…

www.thefuntheory.com

The fun theory doesn’t focus on the VW brand. It’s focus is on entertainment, engagement and behaviour change and that’s where it wins big time. I remember when this first came out in 2009, it was one of the first brands to adopt this concept that didn’t totally focus on shoving the brand in your face. It’s still used as an innovative example to this very day, as I was recently shown it in one of my PR lectures. Enjoy!

 

 

But first, let me take a #Selfie…is this the ultimate in Vanity PR?

But first, let me take a #Selfie…is this the ultimate in Vanity PR?

At the moment you cannot avoid it. There is even a song about it. From no make up versions to power pouts, it’s a trend you can’t seem to escape and it looks like it’s going to be around for a while.

But first, let me take a… The Chainsmokers and the infamous #selfie song!
But first, let me take a… The Chainsmokers infamous song!

Love them or hate them, you have to question what kind of culture they are fostering online? And is it restricted to gender? Tragically a man recently became a selfie recluse and tried to kill himself when he couldn’t obtain what he deemed to be the perfect picture. It’s an extreme example, but an example none the less. This sounds like it has taken the form of addiction but in the case of Eat Pray Love star, James Franco, he know’s exactly what he’s doing. An article in Marie Claire has researched that he is full aware that in the age of hyper-connectivity and online noise, attention is power. Cornelissen, author of Corporate Communciations: a guide to theory and practice, identifies a power, urgency and legitimacy model when it comes to stakeholder salience. People taking selfies can become powerful stakeholders if they gain adequate enough attention. Last night James Franco posted an almost nude and very odd selfie and removed it an hour later (Marie Claire have captured it though, take a look). What did it create? Attention, everyone’s currently talking about…James Franco. Everyone will be paying attention to his twitter account for a little while, so whatever he says is going to have an enhanced focus and a larger reach and therefore when you are trying to be heard amongst the crowd this can be a powerful tool. Large companies are starting to recognise that they could potentially be a profitable trend too. Samsung have identified that selfies are powerful and have decided to capitalise upon it releasing a selfie-specific camera. To be fair, the camera is actually very cool, with some super features, but it does lead to asking the question what or where next for the selfie?

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Space selfies already exist – what next?!

There is also the element of people who are fishing for compliments. Cancer Research UK not only identified this trend but also harnessed it as a PR campaign, which ultimately used vanity PR and converted it into direct donations, the charities main aim. It played upon women empowerment, image and personal identity. By women posting not only were they saying they were confident enough to show the world their face make up free, warts and all but they could also align themselves with being a better person, it just screamed ‘Look everyone, not only am I confident, but I’m generous!’ Through the nominations aspect, other women questioned their peers, willing them to participate, but are they really asking ‘Are you a confident and generous person too?’ No one wants to be seen as insecure or a scrooge! Ultimately it generated a lot of money for charity, which can only be a good thing, I’m just not sure I fully agree with the method, but no one can deny it was a clever PR campaign.

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‘THAT’ Oscars selfie!
Do you pout?
Do you pout?
Or do you look longingly?
Or do you look longingly?

Having not grown up in the age of the selfie I can’t help but think of the impression it may have had on me. Teen Vogue take a psychological stance and address the issue of low self esteem recommending a shift in perspective if all you are looking for are comments. The advice they give is healthy, they don’t say selfies are bad but to make sure they are fun and avoid excessive use. I think it’s important that influencers like Teen Vogue do put out positive messages like this so there is some guidance for people growing up in an ever-image obsessed world. The ‘What I see’ project discusses both sides of the selfie but within a feminist context with a dose of philosophical musings and makes for a very interesting contribution to the debate.

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Would Marilyn Monroe have taken a selfie?
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Will selfies become modern art?

Grace Dent who writes for The Independent also makes the argument that selfies are about self-branding, celebrity-alignment, social climbing and proof of happiness. The more I read the more negative it gets. Are there positive aspects to the selfie? Perhaps I don’t understand the selfie. Do we need to prove to other people that we are happy? What constitutes happiness? Do people want to see others pouting in front of the camera?

What do you think?

Share your comments below, or if you find any good articles or points of view please post them too!